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The Red 'n' Green

The Student News Site of Berlin High School

The Red 'n' Green

The Student News Site of Berlin High School

The Red 'n' Green

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Berlin soccer jerseys reach New Life Community Center in Kenya

Local+physician+and+school+board+member+Dr.+Mike+Shattuck+and+former+principal+Lynn+Mork%E2%80%99s+wife%2C+Pam+Mork+traveled+to+Ndonyo%2C+Kenya+and+donated+old+soccer+jersey+to+the+boys+at+New+Life+Community+Center.+
Pam Mork
Local physician and school board member Dr. Mike Shattuck and former principal Lynn Mork’s wife, Pam Mork traveled to Ndonyo, Kenya and donated old soccer jersey to the boys at New Life Community Center.

Former principal Lynn Mork’s wife, Pam Mork, and Dr. Mike Shattuck began their two week journey to Ndonyo, Kenya Jan. 6, on a mission outreach where they helped in a clinic to help the local people. This outreach provides medical care and other basic resources with the people in and surrounding Ndonyo. Dr. Paul Nelsen runs a missions group out of Ripon that sends teams of medical professionals to the New Life Community Center in Ndonyo, Kenya. Dr. Nelsen himself has two sons both adopted from the Center in Ndonyo. 

“The orphanage, New Life Community Center (NLCC), is located outside Ndonyo, Kenya, a village in remote western Kenya,” Pam Mork said. “It houses 28 boys between the ages of 3-18. There they are provided with the basic essentials of food, housing, schooling, and are taught Christian values.”

Over the years there have been five boys adopted out of the center. Though the people on the missions team were able to go, make the connections, and support the boys face-to-face they are not the only ones looking out for them. Many people made donations and supported the chili dinner, brat sale at Crossroads, and other campaigns to raise money.

“We raised funds to be able to have a clinic with a lab, supply of medications, local dentist, reading glasses, interpreters, and also to pay for transportation and medical services to people who needed care that we could not provide with our limited resources. We also bought a set of clothes for each boy at the orphanage while we were there,” Shattuck said. 

In their time there they saw 819 patients in four days, turning none away.

 “Common ailments included vision problems, dental issues, joint and body aches, broken bones and wounds, respiratory and gastrointestinal conditions. We were able to offer them limited lab testing, medications, tooth removals, wound care, and reading glasses,” Mork said. “If they needed more advanced care we paid for transportation and care at a higher level facility in the nearest city. It was exciting to learn that they are providing obstetrical care and delivering babies at the clinic.”

For Shattuck this was his third time at the Center and Mork’s second. They knew the boys loved to play soccer and that is where their idea arose. 

“Mr. Mork asked if we had any old uniforms sitting in storage. Because these uniforms were no longer part of our uniform rotation, we thought it was a very nice gesture to repurpose these uniforms for the boys in Kenya,” Athletic Director Joe Stellmacher said. 

The boys played a match in their new jerseys while the team was still there and they got to watch the boys win their game repping Berlin on their backs. The contributions the teams over the years have made do not go unnoticed and the boys cherish everything they are given. 

“I wish more people from our country could go to countries like Kenya to understand how lucky we are to live here. I left some of my clothes and shoes there and when we first arrived, Mrs. Mork pointed out that the security guard was wearing the shoes that Mr. Mork left there about two years ago,” Shattuck said. 

The memories are not the only lasting imprint that the team left in Ndonyo, Kenya. 

“The uniforms stayed behind with the boys and will continue to be worn in future matches. Berlin High School made a difference in the lives of these boys in remote Kenya. They were so grateful and asked us to send back a huge thank you,” Mork said. 

Dr. Mike Shattuck checks heart of a young boy at the clinic. The clinic gave medical care to 819 patients in four days. (Pam Mork)
Pam Mork poses with the boys at the New Life Community Center. “We shared meals with them, worshiped, prayed and sang together, making lifelong memories,” Mork said. (Dr Mike Shattuck)

 

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About the Contributor
Jane Hoffman
Jane Hoffman, Reporter
Jane Hoffman is a Berlin High School senior. She is excited to spend her last year of high school writing for the Red ‘n’ Green as editor-in-chief. She is a part of the varsity volleyball and basketball teams. She is also a member of the yearbook club and National Honors Society.